The newest of newbies

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The newest of newbies

Postby theambitiousguy » Sun May 11, 2014 12:22 pm

Hello all,

I've had a San Juan 21 mk 1 for about two or three years now, fixing it up as a hobby. It was in rough shape--increasingly rough the more I found that needed to be fixed--when I got it and I'm almost done totally restoring it (new paint, a few new parts, etc.).

Today's question is whether it would be worth my while to simply fabricate some parts. I can get the companion way hatch board made for reasonably cheap out of plexiglass or I can buy it for $98ish. Likewise, I could fabricate spreaders for pretty cheap or I can buy them for a greater price.

Is there some hidden snafu that I haven't thought about with fabricating (e.g. will it simply wind up being as expensive to make parts as buy them?)

Let me know what you guys think.

Thanks,
Derek
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby kuriti » Mon May 12, 2014 5:32 am

It depends. The companion way door is a cheap and relatively easy fix, particularly if you have the old one. I would use marine plywood and fiberglass unless you are intending for it to be transparent. I have a plexiglass one too, but it is really only for show as it is not strong enough to withstand a major water push if some came over. i use a hatchboard made of wood/fiberglass when i get nervous. Not sure on the spreaders, though make sure you compare DIY spreader tubes that you cut to size plus the fittings as opposed to just aluminum tubing. the latter won't be powder coated and will turn to dust eventually. Dywer should have all the parts you need but compare the cost to Stephen's site below as you may not come out much ahead. I have bought several parts from stephen that i did not want to locate/fabricate:

http://www.sjsailboats.com/parts.php

He is very nice and timely. You will pay a small premium, but it is worth it for many parts to save time and frustration. I have bought my keel gasket, gasket retaining strips, keel bolt and other stuff from Stephen and been pleased. You will know the boat better the more you fabricate, but when it comes to fiddly parts that are hard to find and a pain to return when they don't fit, just outsource it.
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby cklamp » Mon May 12, 2014 4:35 pm

Derek, welcome to the forums! Where are you from?

I agree with Kuriti as I'm a DIY guy to my own detriment sometimes. But, there are some things I wouldn't mess with, spreaders probably being one of them. You probably won't save much money DIYing them, and you'll also be assured you get the exact same thing everyone else is using.

My hatchboard is made of Starboard, but they aren't critical, so as was already posted, do what you want:)

Later
C
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby theambitiousguy » Tue May 13, 2014 1:26 pm

Hey guys, thanks for the insight. I've actually bought quite a bit from Stephen and he's the one who put me up to joining this forum. I'm in Kentucky and keep the boat in my parents' spare barn. I was leaning toward a plywood door (stained and possibly fiberglassed), but it's fairly hard to get accurate measurements. As I said, it's a Mark 1 so the door is a trapezoid shape. My current strategy is to cut the board to the size of the doorway, make sure it fits perfectly, then attach a slider piece to each side.

I'm probably going to hold off on the spreaders for now as I've dumped enough money into my old ship for this month.
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby theambitiousguy » Wed May 14, 2014 11:15 am

Also: what do you guys like in the way of mainsheet rigging? I have what appears to be called a "Crosby rig" set up right now, but I just rigged that up given the blocks and rope available.
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby kuriti » Wed May 14, 2014 11:48 am

Stephen did a great write up on how to cut the companion way door in the Fleet 1 website:

http://www.sj21fleet1.org/tips-and-tricks/hatch

I would personally make a cardboard model first and perfect it, then just trace it on the plywood. One layer of fiberglass on either side will greatly extend the life and strength of the board, but necessitate painting.

I think your mainsheet depends on how you intend to sail. Racers like the sheet midway in the cockpit on a traveler or a "head knocker" set up that allows them to move the boom more inboard than the Crosby while reaching. I had the head knocker and have returned to the stock "crosby" rig with the main cleat on the floor. I didn't like the head knocker because it was properly named and I found it was very hard to release under pressure, particularly while running down wind with the boom out. It felt unsafe and not worth whatever advantage it brought. But, I am cruising and not looking to eek out half a knot. I also like that the stock rig is in the back of the cockpit with the other controls, not taking up space for my kids/wife. Garhauer is the best value in my book should you need to replace any of your blocks or cleats.
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby theambitiousguy » Wed May 14, 2014 12:11 pm

That makes me feel better about it. I too am a cruiser right nowand could afford to give away a knot or two. I just needed a rig to keep the boom from jumping all around.
I tie off one end of the rope to a cleat on the back port corner of the boat, run it up to the end of the boom, around a block on the starboard side, back to the boom, to a block on the port side,and then to the block/cleat on the floor.
Is this right? I attached a picture for vague reference but I'm on my phone so I'm not sure if it'll work right.
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby kuriti » Thu May 15, 2014 5:17 am

close. you don't start on a cleat, you tie it to the becket on the port block (it doesn't really matter which side you start). after that, your explanation is correct. In case you aren't sure, a becket is a place to tie off a line on a block:

Image
Block with Becket. in this pic the becket is at the bottom and the shackle is at the top


Image
Block with no Becket. You can't start the process on a block like this.

That may have been what you meant, but just checking. All the jargon takes a while to master.
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby theambitiousguy » Thu May 15, 2014 12:59 pm

Ah! I had in fact tied it off at the becket but the cleat seemed like a better spot to tie it. Becket it is from here on. I have a topping lift rigged up and of course my halyards. Is there anything else I ought to go ahead and rig?
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Re: The newest of newbies

Postby theambitiousguy » Wed May 21, 2014 6:02 pm

Here's the door! I also dog-sat for a friend and put him up there. He was a good sport about it while I worked. Anyway, the Double Entendre (my boat) will be on the lake tomorrow afternoon for a test run. Maybe out again on Monday. Thanks for your help guys!
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