Sailrite Sail Kits

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Sailrite Sail Kits

Postby jeffd » Sat Mar 29, 2014 8:30 pm

Sewing your own sails, even from a kit, is not for everyone. I had not even considered the idea, until I went to the Havasu Pocket Cruisers Convention in 2012, where I won a $100 gift certificate from Sailrite. After perusing their catalog, I did get the idea to use it to purchase a spinnaker kit, since my old spinnaker is a cruising spinnaker and is much smaller than the standard class spinnaker. Then, at the rigging clinic, Christian brings his new spinnaker, made from a Sailrite kit. It was really nice getting his perspective and experiences in building his spinnaker from a kit.

Spinnaker Kit:

But then, spring and summer come along, so I go sailing. When fall rolled around, I began to rekindle the idea, and decided to order the spinnaker kit in October. One of the fun things about ordering a spinnaker is that you get to select the panel colors. The kit comes very complete, with just about everything you need. Well, except maybe the tools, like the sewing machine.

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I had done some research and watched all of the Sailrite Spinnaker construction videos. Then, I made a bold step and asked my wife if I could use her sewing machine for the project. I did ask BEFORE I ordered the kit! She agreed, on one condition - that after finishing, I would take the machine in for cleaning and service. That was fine with me, and I didn't have to go out and buy a machine.

I was so excited to get into this project that I did not even think about taking any photos. I took over the dining room table for a few days, and was busy basting panels together and sewing the seams. It all went pretty quick, after spending some time getting the sewing machine set up properly to sew the 3/4 oz nylon. It wasn't until I started sewing on the corner patches on the spinnaker before I took the first photo. Here I am sewing the head corner patch:

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One very nice thing about sewing a spinnaker is the material is 3/4 oz nylon - very light, and every easy to handle. Except with the spinnaker, there sure is a lot of it! But still, sewing a long seam was not very hard - even on a standard short arm home sewing machine. It was easy to "stuff" a wad of the nylon under the arm of the machine as you were sewing. Later, I was to find out sewing the heavier dacron sailcloth required some different techniques.

A Good Story:

The spinnaker kit has a good story that goes along with it. I ordered and completed the spinnaker kit first, in October 2012. I was really hoping to find a decent day in January 2013 to try the chute out, before going to the Havasu Pocket Cruiser's Convention in Lake Havasu AZ in February. But the weather didn't cooperate, and there was not a good day in January to try out the chute. So I took my brand new Sailrite sails to Lake Havasu, not having the opportunity to test them.

When I got to Lake Havasu, it was late in the day, so the winds were basically non-existent. After launching the boat, I put the sails up, and hoped for some wind, but no such luck. I finally gave up, motored to the marina, put the boat in the slip, and headed for the hotel. The next day was a Bar-B-Que at Steamboat Cove, about 7 miles south of the Marina. Again, the winds were very light, and so again, I did not get a chance to test my new sails. There was a lot of great food at the BBQ and it was good seeing a lot of sailing friends. My sister and I were to give a talk about our Barkley Sound BC sailing adventure later in the week, and we were told there was a meeting we needed to be at the next day. So we had to motor back to the marina - and the wind was blowing, but we were heading into it, so it would have taken us a long time to beat back, and we would have missed our meeting. So we go to the meeting, test out our slide show and meet a few of the other presenters. Then, we head back to the marina. By now, the wind is really blowing. Lets go sailing! It is blowing quite hard, so I decide it is time to test the second reef in the main. We sail around the island on a double reefed main and jib, making over 5 knots, and I am quite pleased with these new sails. My old blown out sails did not work well reefed down at all. But, they are old Clark Sails, circa 1983 vintage.

Winds were from the north, blowing 15-20 knots, maybe more, and gusty. As we circle the island and sail under the London Bridge, we exit the channel to the south, and I thought, let's launch the spinnaker! Not the best idea. No other boats out sailing, and wind blowing like mad. Notice in the photo that the main is double reefed.

So up the spinnaker goes! And we really take off! I don't remember the speed, but I did manage to take a few photos before . . . the spinnaker pole snaps! As you can see in the photo it is bending a bit.

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And of course, where does it happen? Right in front of the Nautical Inn's Restaurant, which has a really great view of Thompson bay, where we were sailing. We find out later that there were a lot of sailors in the restaurant watching us, and some of them panic-ed when they saw it snap. But no one took a photo . . . so it didn't really happen, right? (ha, ha, ha)

OK, so we did the right thing - release the spinnaker guy and halyard, and pull like mad on the sheet and clew. We did take on a bit of water, and it was really exciting for a bit, but we got the boat under control, and even raised the jib and continued sailing around the island a second time.

So after all that excitement, and another nice sail around the island in a good breeze, I take the broken spinnaker pole (about 30 years old) and new spinnaker back to the hotel to assess the damage. So for 30 years, sailing mostly in the rather calm waters of Washington, where the wind doesn't really blow much, it wasn't' a problem that I attached the pole downhaul in the middle of the pole. It broke in the weak spot that I created when I drilled two holes to mount the ring that the pole downhaul attached to.

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So now what do I do? One of the highlights of the Havasu Pocket Cruisers Convention is the Saturday Parade of Sail under the London Bridge. The parade is downwind, so it is perfect for a new spinnaker. I check with West Marine, but decide that the price of a new one is way too high, and it would have to be air-freighted in. I take the pieces to the local Ace Hardware store, hoping to find a way to fix it. After some searching, I find some copper pipe with the right outside diameter . . . or about the right diameter. Luckily, we got a room at the Nautical Inn that overlooks the cove, and it has a balcony - a perfect place to do some "work".

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After some filing, pounding, drilling, the pole is now somewhat functional again. Well, it isn't class legal anymore, but it will work for the parade of sail. The convention sponsors two races that I can participate in (the third race is by boat manufacturer, but too few Clark boats), except spinnakers are not allowed, so I don't get to try it out in a race. But the repaired pole works great on Saturday's Parade of Sail. Here is a photo of us just after we sailed under the London Bridge, using the repaired pole.

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After getting back to the Seattle area, I ordered a replacement pole from Online metals, for about $40. I thought that was a real steal, comparing it to the cost of a new pole. Then, I realized that the bare T6061 Aluminum pole I ordered comes bare - not anodized, so it oxidizes, and the oxide rubs off on your hands. I looked into the anodizing process, and decided that was a bit too ambitious for me to tackle, mainly not having a trough 8 feet long, and not sure what to do with that much sulphuric acid after finishing the process. Having a shop do the anodizing turned out to be rather expensive. I also looked into power coating, which was less expensive, but I decided to go cheap and just apply a spray clear finish.

OK, back to the sail kits.

Sewing the spinnaker was so much fun. I really mean that. It went together quite easy and fast. Before this, I had very little sewing experience - mostly hand sewing buttons, zippers, repairs, and a long time ago, sewing tents and sleeping bags for G.I. Joes. But I had a lot of determination. And the Sailrite kits are well done. The instructions are very detailed and clear, and their web site has videos illustrating all the major streps and details in constructing the kit. I watched all of the videos a couple of times, to familiarize myself with the process and read the instructions a couple of times.

Guys, I encourage you to not let the gals do the sewing, and have all the fun! My wife did offer to do the sewing, but I declined her offer, because I really wanted to learn and have the experience sewing the sails. It is not that hard. OK, if you take a look at my seams, they are not completely straight and there are some rough spots here and there, but I learned a lot. it was really fun, and I got a lot of satisfaction completing the sails. Some of the detailed finish work, and had sewing did get a bit tedious, but I was determined and just worked diligently to finish the job.

Genoa and Jib Kits:

Back to Fall 2012 - So, I had so much fun sewing the spinnaker, I decided that I'd take on the Genoa and Jib. The one thing I was a bit worried about was the sewing machine's ability to sew through 5 layers of dacron. But the spinnaker kit used 5 layers of dacron at the head, clew and tack, and the machine sewed through all 5 layers without a problem. So I ordered both kits in November. After they came, I eagerly tacked the genoa first, thinking I'd do the lighter material (4.4 oz dacron versus 5.5 oz dacron) first. In hindsight, it probably would have been better to tackle the jib first, because it is smaller - less dacron to have to manage.

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The genoa and jib kits were very complete and instructions and videos were very helpful. Again, I take over the dining room, and eventually slopping over into the living room. This time, the sewing machine migrates to the workspace. I utilize a lot extra furniture and 'stuff' to help manage the large amounts of dacron I am working with.

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This sewing is a bit more tedious than the spinnaker. After basting (using double stick tape) the seams together, I need to roll up the panels and carefully maneuver them under the sewing machine arm, while trying to keep the stitching as straight as possible. If you've ever handled new sails you know the dacron is slippery. This sewing machine does not have a walking foot - it depends on the bottom "teeth" to dig in to advance the material. But dacron, is slippery, so the teeth don't dig in well, and it takes a lot of operator intervention to keep the seam moving through the machine. Then, after sewing a few feet, I run out of room, and have to shift everything so I don't have to 'bend' my new sails. Notice I use whatever I can find (chairs, couch cushions, etc) to help support the sail as it moves through the machine.

Here I am finally getting to the edges. I think this is the luff I am sewing. There is a lot more here than the spinnaker. The luff seam contains a stretched bolt rope which is used to give the sail shape when the halyard is eased. So I need to carefully sew the seam and NOT sew the bolt rope! Again, I invent crude and clever ways to keep the sail rolled up, and keep the ends of the sail supported, as I sew the luff.

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The leech seam is much easier, but it has the leech line, so again, don't sew the leech line! Now, I think I am getting pretty good at maneuvering this roll of sail, and my family is very patient with me, giving up the dining and living room and lots of other furniture.

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Here's a shot of the tack, showing one of the hand sewn rings. This is one of the tedious parts of the project. The brass ring is hand sewn into the tack - that's 7 layers of 4.4 oz dacron! It didn't take me long to see the wisdom of investing in the right tools - off to West Marine to get a Sailmaker's palm. Now, it is much easier to push the needle through. I learn this technique of using the ring to spread the load from the tack eye to the sail is a very old and tried and true technique used for a long time. Yes, it is a lot of work, but I find this work very satisfying.

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Here's a shot of the head - pretty much the same as the tack, except much narrower. But the same idea - sew the ring in place and sew it to the eye, to help spread the load to the sail.

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The next step after all that hard hand sewing is to cover the corners with leather, so you don't see all of my ugly stitchery! I get a bit smart and cut paper patterns to fit, before cutting into this expensive leather.

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We are getting very close! Now, its time to do the pounding work, so I get out the big hammer. Here I am installing the spur grommets in the luff. Now this is fun - line everything up, and give it a firm whack with the big hammer! By now, my family is tolerating just about everything, so the noise does not bother anyone - at least no one tells me they are bothered!

I didn't show the last step - crimping the hanks to the grommets, but it was fun and very satisfying to complete the genoa.

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Jib Kit

With the genoa completed, I move on to the jib. The dacron is heavier, but the panels are smaller, and now, I have experience managing rolls of slippery dacron, and have worked out systems to support the sail as it moves through the machine. Sorry for the blurry image, but here's the beginning of the project: sewing the jib panels together:

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I am starting to get better at this sailmaking stuff. I might not have the best tools, but I take what I can get my hands on and make it work!

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Here I am sewing the luff of the sail:

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And here is a shot of some other 'stuff' I used to help support the sail as it moved through the machine. Note, the completed genoa is rolled up on the floor. Hmm, is it starting to look like a sail loft in here?

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Now, I moved to the floor. As I recall, I needed to pull the bolt rope through the seam of the luff, and it was easier to do that on the floor. So I think I decided to finish the seam on the floor.

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Here's a shot of the head, as I am trying to figure out where to place the brass ring, to be sewn in - just like the genoa.

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So the jib did go a lot faster, since I had the experience with the genoa. Some of the sewing in the corners was a bit of a challenge with the thicker dacron, but with a bit of technique and perseverance, everything came together and it was a great feeling to have new sails.

Mainsail Kit

So with some confidence and experience in sailmaking, I decide that I will tackle the mainsail kit, realizing that it is a lot more work, but I was having so much fun doing the other sails. So I order the mainsail kit. I requested TWO reef points, even though the sailmaker normally only puts one in a main for boats under 25 feet. I requested that he put the first reef point in a bit 'short', so it is maybe 80% of a normal reef. Then, the second one is pretty deep - above the lower batten. The cost of the second reef in the kit was minimal, and I am really glad I put in two reefs.

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By now, it is early December. The boat is in the driveway, with the Christmas Lights up. Christmas tree is up, and the house is decorated. Somehow, I manage to lobby the family to let me take over the dining room and living room again, to build the main.

As you can imagine, the mainsail kit is a lot more involved than sewing a spinnaker or jib. My sail has two reef points, a cunningham hole and slugs along the luff, plus standard stuff on a mainsail: four battens, SJ21 logo, numbers, draft stripe.

So I read and reread the instructions carefully, and watch all of the videos several times. I'm ready to dive in! I look carefully at the diagram, carefully noting what I can sew in BEFORE sewing all of the panels together. I sew some of the reef points and battens into the panels before sewing the panels together. This helps, but it is still rather difficult to sew in the middle of the sail.

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The upper reef points need to be sewn in across a seam between panels:

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I manage to invent ways to keep the sail rolled up (e.g. rubber bands, plastic yogurt tubs cut just right, weights, etc) so I can push all that dacron through the neck of the sewing machine:

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I get most of the sail completed, but its time to take a break for Christmas - meaning I need to abandon the living room and dining room. Our family takes a trip to visit my mom and my sister. What good timing! My sister offers to loan me her Sailrite Ultrafeed sewing machine. Now this is THE machine to sew sails with! She bought it when it first came out many years ago, when it was still rather expensive, but less than now. The Ultrafeed (and probably other high-end sewing machines) has a "walking foot", meaning the foot "grabs" the fabric and moves it along, instead of just the bottom "jaws" gripping the fabric. For "normal" fabric, the standard sewing machines work fine, but new dacron is slippery, and the standard machine's top presser foot and lower jaws just don't feed the dacron very well - it takes a lot of effort to keep the sail feeding into the machine, and not falling off the table, or unrolling, etc.

So now armed with a "real" sewing machine, sewing the leech pocket is easy - even through the multiple layers in the tack, clew, reef points and head.

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Here I am sewing the sleeve the Luff - the bolt rope will be pulled through the sleeve later. I sure am thankful to have the Ultrafeed sewing machine. It had no problems sewing the multiple layers of heavy dacron, and feeding was easy - that walking foot makes all the difference in the world.

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Here's anther shot of my workspace:

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OK, we're getting close. Here's a shot of the head of the sail. I am back on the floor - I am pulling the bolt rope through the luff sleeve.

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Here's a closeup of finishing the batten pockets. Hmm, how embarassing! My stitchery is kind of "rough" and messy. Very crude, by professional sailmaker standards, but I am being careful to not sew the leech line in, and make any other dumb mistakes. I am also trying hard to make sure the stitching is strong and durable. Looks to me is secondary. Take a look at my boat and that is very obvious!

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Here's a closeup of one of the sewn in eyes. This is tedious work, but after having done a number of them on the genoa and jib, I am pretty used to this now. I need to do SEVEN of these: Tack, Clew, Cunningham, 2 for 1st reef, and 2 for 2nd reef. The head has a headboard, and the reef sail ties are spur grommets.

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Then, to protect the stitching, the sewn eye is finished with an a brass eyelet and flared with a die set.

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I use slugs along the luff, so the mainsail can be be furled on the boom. To accommodate the slugs, spur grommets are installed along the luff. Spur grommets are also used for the sail ties at the reef points. Spur grommets are kind of fun to install - cut a hole with a hole cutter, then set two halves of the grommet in place, put them on the Die Set, and give it a good whack with the big hammer!

To help keep the peace in the family, I moved the sail out into the garage to do the whacking. Setting the eyelets and grommets works much better on the cement floor anyway.

On the left of this photo shows the zip up sail bag that I made. I didn't tread my old sails very well, stuffing them into big sail bags. But since I was making new sails and spending all this money, time and effort, I decide that I will treat them well, and store them rolled up. But I wanted bags that I could get the sails into easily, so I decided to make my own and put the zipper along the top. They work pretty well, and after rolling the sails on deck, I just kind of wrap the bag around them, zip them up, and carry them below. Side benefit: I also got to learn how to sew zippers!

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Here, I am snapping on the slugs along the foot, after whacking the spur grommets. On the brown paper, you can see the black anvil and die used to set the spur grommet. Sigh, these are some of the special tools I had to purchase (about $30 - $58, and I had to buy THREE of them, total $120) to complete the genoa, jib and mainsail kits.

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I am now applying the finishing touches - two draft stripes, telltales along the leech, and finally . . . the San Juan 21 Logo and hull numbers (not shown)! The Logos are not sold by Sailrite, but they sell the adhesive backed insignia cloth. So I traced the insignia from the old sails, cut out new ones and applied them to both sides of the sail. The trickiest part was to try to arrange things so they didn't overlap any seam. They don't stick well if they cross a seam.

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The Ultrafeed Sewing Machine also works great on nylon. Here, I am sewing my spinnaker turtle. The trickiest part of that project was sewing the circular bottom. More sewing challenges means I learn a few things!

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Boat Pockets

Ok, having completed four sail kits, I now turned to one of those "someday" boat projects - some boat pockets to keep all of those lines organized. I purchased two yards of Sunbrella and sewed these two boat pockets: one on each side of the companionway.

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Boat pockets by nature are a custom project, and it was fun planning and sewing them. I set the boat up and rigged it in my driveway, so I'd know exactly where each line led, and how much I'd need to store in each pocket. Then, I cut the material and sewed up the pockets. The Ultrafeed sewing machine was a real asset - my wife's home sewing machine could not even handle two layers of Sunbrella. In this project, I was sewing 4-5 layers together at some points.

The boat pockets project added a lot to the boat - now I have no excuse for having messy lines all over the place. The Sunbrella fabric works great, although I realized that it is probably kind of overkill for this application. I trailer sail my boat, so most of the time, the pockets are inside away from the sun. So I probably could have used a much lighter (and less expensive) fabric to accomplish the same task.

With the extra scraps from the 2 yards, I also sewed covers for all of the teak - handrails, and hatch slides. Now this is a good application for Sunbrella. I leave these covers on all the time, so they offer UV protection for the varnish. They also protect the wood when I am trailering the boat, like here at Lake Havasu City, Arizona:

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So, Was it worth it?/

OK, so after all of that work, did the new sails pay off in increased performance? Well, one event with a bunch of cruisers (and maybe a handful of racers) is probably not a good comparison, but my one claim to fame is a First Place in the "B" fleet (18-22ft) at the Havasu Pocket Cruisers Convention February 2013. Here we are beating toward the windward mark:

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and here are the standings:

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This was a non handicapped race. It was fun beating all of the Catalina 22's and Ranger 20's, but to be fair, most of the other boats were cruisers. One of the satisfying points was passing about half of the "A" fleet (23' and longer), which started 10 minutes before we did. But that group probably had a higher percentage of cruisers - both the boats and the crews.

In the other race I could participate in, the Long Distance race, which was a handicapped race, I placed 5th out of 104 boats, but probably only about 15-20 boats were seriously competing. Nevertheless, I am very pleased with the new sails, especially the two reef points in the main. I have used them multiple times sailing in Arizona, where the winds can blow 15-25 knots and it is 70-80 degrees, and the water is fairly flat too. I have also used the reef points on Harrison Lake BC, when the wind was blowing over 20 knots.

I did manage to win one Fleet race in the first race of the Spring 2013 season, but I think that was because I had just spent a week sailing in Arizona, and everyone else was rusty from not sailing all winter. That victory was short lived. I fell toward the bottom of the pack for the rest of the races.

After completing the kits, I made good on my end of the bargain and brought my wife's sewing machine in for cleaning and service. They cleaned it, adjusted and lubed it, and even fixed the needle threader. My wife is now happy.

Prices:

OK, the part some of you were waiting for: did I save any money? Here are the stats:

Spinnaker Kit, 3/4 oz nylon: $436
(I got $100 off, using a gift certificate I won)
Spinnaker Turtle kit: $53
Jib Kit, 5.5 oz Dacron: $315
Genoa Kit, 4.4 oz Dacron: $395
Main Kit, 5.93 oz Dacron: $512
(2 reefs, Insignia, numbers, slugs in luff)
Sail bag materials (2 sail bags): $90
Tools (3 die sets, hole cutter,
sailmaker's palm): $175
(prices are in Fall 2012, with seasonal discounting applied)

So I think I saved a bit of money - maybe not a whole lot. It took a while (my guess is probably 3-5 full days for each sail) but I got a lot of satisfaction completing the kits, and I learned a lot. Quality wise, the workmanship is not nearly as nice as a professional sailmaker, and I am responsible for fixing any problems - I can't go running to the sailmaker with complaints or problems. Performance wise, the results are debatable. Probably, the brand name sails are slightly better - if nothing else, if you are not satisfied, the sailmaker will fix them for you. But I would do it again next time, except I need to figure out a way to afford (or "justify") purchasing an Ultrafeed sewing machine!
Last edited by jeffd on Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:28 am, edited 15 times in total.
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Re: Sailrite Sail Kits

Postby kuriti » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:14 am

Thanks for posting this! I am seriously debating whether to do this or not. I can't decide for sure. I want the skills so that i can repair sails down the road when we get a live aboard, but i am just not sure if i have the energy right now. i also would rather not buy a new sewing machine. i have an old cast iron electric one from the 60s that is pretty heavy duty, but probably not enough for a mainsail. I like hand sewing stuff though, so those reef points look fun. i don't have a sailmakers palm, but i do have this that i bought for sewing leather for a project my daughter had. i highly recommend:

http://www.amazon.com/Speedy-Stitcher-T ... B000HGIJQ4

i was hoping that the difference in the new cost vs DIY would pay for a sailrite sewing machine, but probably not. I take your post as a sign from fate to head in that direction though and will start monitoring criagslist. if i can get a cheap sewing machine, i will do it. i live in NC, a major garment maker, so it shouldn't be that hard to find a canvas duty machine. I will share whichever i choose.

thanks,

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Re: Sailrite Sail Kits

Postby cklamp » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:18 pm

Kuriti, I've done a spinnaker, based on a fairly accomplished sailer I sail with who's done many spinnakers' recommendation and when he showed up to race with me having just put together an SJ21 spinnaker from one of these kits. and Jeff as noted decided to do his after I went down that path:) So I have some experience with the real light weight fabric, as well as the heavier fabric kits. Jeff, nice write up, nice to get your POV and experiences!

Here's what I'd add... In terms of cost, spinnakers WILL be cheaper, about 5-600$ depending on options, cut, etc, vs probably twice as much for a professionally made Spinn. And i've found the perf is right on par with the Doyle, Kerr, US, etc that are prevalent in the SJ21 Fleet. 1 Year at the TYC Summer vashon, Stephen Jensen with a Doyle, Jim Miller with a Kerr iirc, and myself with my Sailrite home sewed spinnaker all got to the leward mark, about a 6 mile run about 20-30 seconds apart... That's amazingly close for that length of time. There were 30 minute intervals here and there where we were all just feet apart, and absolutely matching each other speed for speed. Some of the most fun sailing i've had with the fleet:)

The spinnaker I put together is a full radial which sailrite calls an SKR cut I think, Jeff's appears to be radial head and corners, but cross cut center which is what my buddy put together only in the really light fabric. That sail has taken a Bullet, and a 3rd overall at NOOD as well, so I feel it's competitively designed also. The full radial does increase the amount of panels and work exponentially, but it's worth it since all the "pulling" is along the seems. I'm also hoping the Spinnaker will last a bit longer without some of the "blowing" out you get in the center of some of them. I did do the heavier weight though, so it's NOT a light wind spinnaker. But there are things i'll do different next time to fix that.

For the heavier spinn's Sailrite recommends double stitching. I don't know what they recommend for the light fabric, but either way i'll probably just do 1 row, and save some thread weight. I'll also get rid of the heavy steel D-rings that sailrite sends and just sew in some "webbing" with those Sister clips that come apart really easy. The heavier weight fabric comes in more colors so your options are greater, and it should last longer as well, but it's fairly heavy. I'll probably be putting together a light wind spinnaker at some point this coming year.

Main's and Jib's really won't save you much money at all. But you will gain the knowledge, as Jeff stated about how to fix them, how they went together, etc, etc. The sailmaker i've bought professionaly made sails from, Island Planet Sails, is maybe 5% more expensive than the Sail rite kits. So it's a no brainer for me to just keep buying professionally made sails. Also, IPS isn't a big "brand" name like Doyle, or as involved in the class, but my results at NOOD have shown they are every bit as capable, so win win.

I stow my main on the boom, wrapped around it, to give it some stiff\crispness. Some roll their main up and lash it to the boom, but I think that ends up crushing the main a bit in some places as it smashes down around the boom, as opposed to having a solid center in it. I also wrap my Jib on a cardboard sleeve. Can't take credit for that, I saw Marc Vanderschalie, Kermit, doing it a few years back. It sure keeps the jib from getting that "soft" spot near the clew.

My .02$

Later
C
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Re: Sailrite Sail Kits

Postby cklamp » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:21 pm

Also, i've done the homemade spinn pole as well like Jeff. I ended up using some RWO ends that have plastic inserts. I was afraid of things snapping too as Chris Popich had given me his old pole which had Forespar ends and a really thin piece of tubing. When I did mine, I bought the ends, took a caliper to the thinest part of the fitting" and bought a pole with a thicker wall. The fittings have ribs, so I cut those off and sanded them round to accomodate the thicker pole. It still bends, but I don't think she's going to break. Maybe in 30 years or so like Jeff's did:)

I also debated the corrosion, and decided to just paint my pole. cheap, easy, backyard fix

later
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Re: Sailrite Sail Kits

Postby kuriti » Tue Apr 01, 2014 8:33 am

Thanks for the insight Cklamp. I am thinking i will sew a spinnnaker for cost and a jib for experience, then just buy a main. i went back and read the article below about improving your home sewing machine. If you haven't seen it, it is pretty cool. I think i could easily do a spinnaker and manage a jib with my current machine. i have no interest in becoming a sailmaker, but would like to know how to repair a sail. i may put a reef in my current sail soon as a first project. i don't expect to start any of this any time soon as i can't even find time to get on my newly restored boat for a weekend sail! i have been traveling every weekend for work and play for the last 2 months....

http://www.sailrite.com/Using-a-Home-Se ... zrbc-NdVqw
kuriti
 
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