Lake Powell Cruise Report

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Lake Powell Cruise Report

Postby jeffd » Fri Jan 02, 2015 11:47 pm

Last year (Fall 2013), I was planning on cruising Lake Powell (Arizona/Utah) with a couple of pocket cruiser friends I know from the Lake Havasu Pocket Cruiser's Convention. But the government had other ideas. The day after I left the Seattle area for Lake Powell, the government ran out of money and shut down all non essential services. The shutdown closed all of our National Parks, including Lake Powell. So I met my friends at Lake Havasu and we went sailing there instead.

This year, we decided to try Lake Powell again. I was excited and got everything packed and ready. I was planning to be on the lake for two full weeks. The day for my departure finally arrived and I left home in late September. It's quite a long drive from the Seattle area to Page Arizona, where we planned to launch. I made very good progress the first day. I was doing pretty good the second day, until I heard a loud BANG! from the front of the Van. Oh, no. I feared the worst, and I'm on I-15 in southern Utah, and kind of in the middle of nowhere. So I pull over. Hmm, the Van still seemed to drive OK. But I heard a loud hissing sound from the left front tire. It was sunny and quite warm. The tire's sidewall had split! Well, at least I have a good spare. I change the tire in the hot sun, and continue driving south. I wonder where I am going to get a new tire, when I see a sign for Meadow Tire - wow, lucky me. It turned out to be the gas station in Meadow Utah, but they do sell tires, and they even have one that fits. So I buy a tire, have it installed, and I'm back on the road. I continue driving south in Utah, then east just north of the Arizona border. It's a beautiful drive and the mountains at sunset and dusk come alive with color. But it's pitch dark by the time I get to the outskirts of Page Arizona. Just outside the city limits . . . . I hear another BANG! Hiss. Hmm, I've heard that sound before - earlier today. Yep, another blowout. This time, it's the van's left rear tire. Same thing - the sidewalk split. Here's a photo:

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This time, it is very dark. I get out my headlamp and change the tire. At least I am familiar with the process! Ok, two blowouts in one day, so I decide it's time to get new tires for the van and I'd better get them first thing tomorrow. At least I'm here in Page Arizona, where there are several places I could get tires.

After getting new tires in the morning, I head for the Wahweap boat ramp. The water at Lake Powell is down quite far this fall, about 100 feet below full pool. That means the launch ramp is way, way down there, and a long walk! The other problem is the ramp is not very steep way down there at the bottom. But, I am prepared. Last spring, I had to back the van quite far into Lake Mead to get the boat off the trailer. So I added a tongue extension to my trailer. It adds about 6.5 feet to the tongue, and it came in handy at Lake Powell. Unfortunately, like most boat ramps, it was busy, with large houseboats being taken out by large semi-trailers. I managed to squeeze in by the dock, but I didn't feel I had the time to stop and take any photos. I just launched the boat, and drove off to the long term parking lot. Here is a photo of the dock I took after parking the van:

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It was a nice day, and getting quite hot, in the high 80's. But this is what I came to Lake Powell for - to go sailing in shorts and t-shirt weather! Here is a Google Earth view of my GPS track for the day:

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One great improvement this year at Lake Powell is the dredging of "The Cut". This allowed me to take the shortcut to the main part of the lake. Normally, at low lake levels, I'd have to motor south toward Page, then take the narrow channel winding by Antelope Point marina, and back up to the main channel - that route is a lot longer, and much rougher - the powerboats go through at full speed, causing a lot of wash - they call this channel "Maytag Straits". I'm glad I didn't have to experience it, although some of the narrow parts I did have to go through did have a lot of wash from fast boats.

The day's destination was Padre Bay. My friends were already there, and they emailed me their GPS location and a description of how to get there. Unfortunately, I was not paying attention, and ended up turning north a bit too early. Still, I got to see some spectacular scenery:

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This rock formation is named "Gunsight Butte", and I can see why. The sun is starting to set, and the colors are really coming out.

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My friends found a nice shaded beach - very close to here, but it was on the other side of the butte - the shady side. It was less than a half a mile from here, but to get from here to there, I had to motor back out to the main channel and then up and around. So it was a good learning experience reading the chart, which uses a datum of full pool - about 100 feet above where the lake was. So I motor around and eventually get there . . . after dark! I motored/sailed 19.9 NM today.

The next day, our plan is to go up West Canyon. Here is a track of our route:

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As we left the other side of Gunsight Butte, I took a photo. I can see that it would be shaded on this side of the butte, and probably quite nice in the hot afternoons.

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I am learning some strategy about cruising Lake Powell. Even in late September/Early October, the daytime temperatures are usually in the 80's and there is a lot of sun. So shade and lots of sunscreen is pretty much required equipment. We picked this time of year because the temperatures are down from the summer (when the daytime temperatures are over 100), but the water is still warm enough to swim. The crowds are not quite as bad as in the summer, but there still were a lot of boats.

There wasn't much wind, so we motored the whole way. I was warned not to expect a lot of sailing here at Lake Powell. Here is a photo of us motoring up the channel to West Canyon. As you can see, I am using a 'cheap' tarp for my shade, but it does have a couple of tent poles to give it some stiffness, and it is tied down by some parachute cord. It worked quite well, except I can't sail with the tarp up.

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We get to the entrance of West Canyon, and turn in. I really enjoy this kind of exploring. The paper chart and the Navionics chart on the iPhone do give you a pretty good idea of what's ahead, but they don't show you the views:

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We are getting toward the end of the canyon. The walls are becoming steeper and the canyon narrows. This is fun! We finally get to the end of the canyon. The head of the canyon is quite shallow, and not really suitable for beaching, so we head back to a little beach we saw on the way in. This beach was just about right - steep enough to beach the boats, and it was in the shade! We tie up, relax, go for a swim, and catch up - I haven't seen my friends since Lake Mead in April. Today, I motored 14.3 NM.

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Track: Sail out of West Canyon, back to main channel, then north to Rock Creek Bay

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Last night, we had wind, lightning in the distant, thunder, then calm. Looks like a storm's on its way. The weather forecast confirms that. But that means we have great wind, and its going our way! But first, a quick breakfast:

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We get to sail all the way out of West Canyon. There is a pretty good breeze, but as you can see in the track above, the canyon has a lot of turns. I elect to be lazy and sail out of the canyon on the jib alone. Lots of gybes on the way out.

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and some great scenery, and warm weather.

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We finally make it back out to the main channel. I say goodbye to my friends, who head south back toward Page, while I head north.

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Out on the main channel, the wind is kicking up - that promised storm is on the way. I switch over to the storm jib (my cut down Clark jib) and put the 2nd reef in the main. I'm moving along, running at over 5 knots.

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The storm really picks up! Here I'm making 6.7 knots surfing on a 23 knot gust, and that's relative wind!

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It was a pretty quick ride up Rock Creek Bay. I choose an inlet on the west side near the end, and find a nice sandy beach next to a steep canyon wall - maybe offering a bit of lighting protection?

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The wind now really starts to howl. I make sure my sand anchors are well set.

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I put up my boom tarp and cook dinner. The rain comes, and it starts to pour. My anemometer records wind gusts to 29.9 knots. But I am warm and dry inside. I sailed 14.2 NM today.

The next day, It is clear in the morning, and the forecast is partly sunny, so I decide its time for a hike. I head up Rock creek. The guide book indicates there is an old cattle trail up to an arch - Woolsey Arch. I decide to try to take the trail - the high road, instead of hiking along the river, since there has been a lot of rain.

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I think I missed the trail. I end up on slick rock, having to cross side washes and steep canyons, so I decide to give up and head back. I decide to descend down and hike along the river.

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Hiking the river is pretty cool. The views are different down here. Careful! Watch out for quick sand! I eventually make it back to the boat. The clouds and sun make for some pretty impressive views.

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Late in the afternoon, there was more rain. Wind, rain, then sun, and repeat. I get to watch waterfalls form before my very eyes! It was quite a sight.

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The next day, I decide to motor around to the next cove, take a hike, and try my luck at finding another arch - Humdinger Arch. I motor deep into the inlet, and beach the boat.

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I then proceed to hike, up and down the washes. No trail, and I only have a general idea where this arch is.

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I hike a while, and then decide to give up and head back to the boat. The storm has passed, and I decide to move on. There is a "floating restroom" at the mouth of Rock Creek Bay, so I stop there on the way out, and dump the porta-potty. Then I head for Grotto Canyon. Here is my track:

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On the chart, Grotto Canyon looked interesting - there is a narrow winding part at the end - good for exploring. It also looks more sheltered, and the chart shows an arch on the cliff above. When I get there, I go in search for a beach. I see lots of slick rock. I see one beach on the south side, but it has signs of occupation, so I keep looking. I find one very small patch of sandy beach on the north side, with rock on both sides, and decide this is camp for the night.

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On the way in, I put out and set a stern anchor, then beach the bow, and drag the bow anchor up to what little sand I could find. I go exploring on the rocks above, and look - there is the arch that the map indicates, I think. I motored 7.4 NM today. The night was very calm - a welcome change from the previous two nights.

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The following morning, I am treated to a great view:

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I cook breakfast and prepare to go canyon exploring in the boat. But first, I climb up on the rocks a bit, and and get a good look at where Grotto Canyon goes.

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Then, I push off the beach and head up Grotto Canyon. Lets see how far we can go up. The walls go straight up, and the canyon winds its way around, with lots of turns. Pretty soon, it gets pretty narrow. Fun! I like exploring these slot canyons.

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Looks like I can't get to the end, without getting stuck, so I back out.

Now, its time to continue north. Here is my crazy track for the day:

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The wind is good, so I sail north.

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Why is my track so crazy? Well, I've been trying to get hold of my friends from Arizona. Cell coverage is not that good in this part of Lake Powell. So we depend on VHF. I sail north a few miles, then I hear my friend calling me on the VHF. I call back, but he doesn't hear me. I figure he is south so I turn around. Now I am beating in to the wind, which is still pretty good. I decide to stop off at Dangling Rope Marina, to top off gas, and see if my friend is there. Nope, he's not there. I head back out and call him on the VHF. This time, he can hear me. He is in Dungeon cove, which is the cove just to the south of Grotto cove - where I was that morning. So I head for Dungeon cove and meet my friends. Today, I sailed/motored 16.7 miles.

Dungeon cove is quite picturesque. The name isn't very appealing, but the views are pretty good. And there are a lot of great beaches too.

It is great seeing my friends again. They came up to the San Juan Islands this summer and I met them and sailed with them for a few days.

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We decide on a plan for the next day: Visit Rainbow Bridge. Here is my track, which includes motoring back to Dangling Rope Marina with my friends for Ice Cream, then motoring north and searching for a place to camp. More on this later.

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We get a little wind so we sail as much as we can, toward Rainbow Bridge.

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Finally, its time to motor. The canyon up to Rainbow Bridge has a lot of turns, but it is pretty wide. There is a fair amount of boat traffic - understandable. Rainbow Bridge is a National Monument, and is pretty famous.

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When we get to the Rainbow Bridge docks, the tour boat is there. But we are in luck - just as we arrive, the tour boat leaves.

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So we take the short hike up to Rainbow Bridge. The views do not disappoint. The bridge is quite spectacular, and the sun and clouds add a lot to the views.

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Then, we leave Rainbow bridge, and head back to Dangling Rope Marina. I top off my fuel, fill up with water, and get some ice cream. Then, we say our goodbyes, and my friends head south, while I head north.

One piece of advice I was given was to make sure I had a place to camp before it got too late. In many areas, the good campsites get taken by the early or mid afternoon. Some canyons are all rock with no good campsites. And it is no fun searching for a place to camp in the dark. Well, today, I waited too long. As I sailed north from Dangling Rope Marina late in the day, I was searching for places to camp. I didn't see very many promising ones. Lots of slick rock. No beaches. It was getting close to dark, so I headed up Cathedral Canyon, and motored up the canyon a ways, desperately searching for a beach. It was all slick rock. I did notice one possible sheltered place, but it was rock. I decided to cut across the main channel to Driftwood canyon. But Driftwood canyon was all slick rock and not very sheltered either. The wind was still blowing pretty well too. I decided I'd take the one spot I saw in Cathedral Canyon. I got there when it was pretty dark, and gently nudged the boat onto the rock. To my relief, it was quite calm. I put an old boat cushion under the bow, to protect it from the rock, and tied the bow off to a convenient rock. Then, relieved that I had found a place to camp for the night, I cooked dinner in the dark, enjoyed the stars, and went to bed. Traveled 29.4 NM, mostly motoring, and a lot of back and forth travel.

Here is a shot of my camp spot, in the morning.

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It turned out to be a nice spot, despite it being all rock. But I learned my lesson and decided from now on I would make sure I had a good camp before it got too late.

So now, its time to go and explore Cathedral Canyon.

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The canyon goes back almost 2 miles. Deeper in, the walls become steeper and taller. It is quite calm in here this morning, but last night, the wind was blowing pretty hard.

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I think this is the end of the road for me.

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I kept thinking that I need to find a place I can tie the boat up to, so I could continue in the kayak!

OK, time to continue north. Here is my track for the day: Continue north from Cathedral Canyon, and stop at Oak Bay for lunch. Then continue north, and find a place to camp near the San Juan River arm. On the track, I forgot to start the track recorder when I left Oak bay, so there is a bit of a gap.

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I stopped at Oak Bay for lunch. Oak bay has a lot of sandy beaches - a bit of a contrast to the slick rock canyons that I explored this morning. I see a couple of houseboats and boat camps in this area. The chart shows a few canyons but the water level ends up being too low.

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After lunch, I continue north. My goal is to find a nice place to camp, near where the San Juan River meets Lake Powell. I find a nice place to camp - nice beach, with a nice swimming rock nearby, and some good views. Motored 16.0 NM today.

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The next morning, I am greeted with another awesome view.

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Here is my track of a trip part way up the San Juan River. I would have liked to go farther, but there is so much to see here at Lake Powell, and I wanted to save some time (and gas) for the next arm up - the Escalante arm.

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There's no wind, so this is a motoring trip. Here I am exploring a side canyon - Bald Rock Canyon:

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More views from the San Juan River:

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The chart shows the location of Rim Arches - and I look . . . way up near the top of the rocks, and . . . there they are!

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You might have noticed maybe a bit of an obsession about arches in this writeup. Maybe its because one of the hiking guides I read before coming to Lake Powell showed a lot of the more spectacular arches, with beautiful color photos. I guess I came expecting to see a lot of them, and the chart shows the approximate location of many of them. So by now, I am realizing that it takes a bit of effort to find the arches. You might have to be in just the right place, and look at just the right viewing angle to see them.

OK, its time to head back out. The San Juan River arm goes quite a ways back. Someday, maybe I'll return and go up farther. By now, the sun is up and it is getting quite hot, so up goes the shade. Still no wind, so its a motor trip back out, but the scenery is great.

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I can't resist - another trip up a side canyon. This is Deep Canyon, and I am attempting to see . . . another arch! Looking at the chart, it is kind of iffy, but I manage to get to just the right location and look at just the right angle, and there it is - Beverly Arch:

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I continue motoring along, with my trusty autopilot steering. The autopilot makes the long motoring less monotonous. It steers a nice straight compass course, and I can move around the boat, take photos, eat lunch, and otherwise enjoy the journey.

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Late in the afternoon, I get back to where the San Juan Arm meets Lake Powell. Time to go looking for a place to camp. I notice that my camp spot from last night has not been taken yet, so I decide to stay there again for another night. Today, I motored a total of 33.8 NM.

Here's my track for the next day: From the San Juan arm, I motor back to the main channel of Lake Powell, then turn north (after making a navigational error!). My goal is to head up the Escalante River Arm and camp somewhere up in one of the side canyons.

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But on the way, I find a couple of interesting side canyons to explore. Here, I am turning into Llewelyn Gulch.

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Up there, somewhere on the rock face, is supposed to be some petroglyphs, according to the guide book.

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I slowly motored by, but didn't see them.

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Still, it was a nice and peaceful place to explore, with some interesting rock formations.

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This is the famous "Hole In the Rock", where in 1880, the Mormon San Juan Expedition, brought 250 people and 83 full sized wagons down this slot. (ref: Wikipedia) Wow!

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Now, I am heading up into the Escalante River Arm. I plan to motor up the Davis Gulch, and hope to find a place to camp along the way.

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Davis Gulch is pretty spectacular - steep canyon walls, twists and turns, and it gets pretty narrow.

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Look! Another Arch! OK, it is kind of a hole in the rock, but they call it an arch. This is LaGorce Arch, which is pretty famous. I pause for a moment, take a few photos, then continue on.

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The water ends just around the corner, and there is a very nice beach campsite - and it is not occupied. So I claim it, and tie up. Today, I motored 20.1 NM.

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As I am inflating the kayak to go exploring, another boat comes in, sees that I have occupied the site, and leaves. Later, another boat comes in and likewise, leaves. Too bad they weren't sailboats - I would have invited them to share the beach!

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I kayak back to LaGore Arch and get a few more photos.

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What a place! In this photo, you can see my boat camp on the left, and the channel back out to the right. LaGorce Arch is a hole through that rock in the middle of the photo. I got to see both sides of this arch.

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Here is the back side of LaGorce Arch - from just past my camp.

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There is yet another more spectacular arch, Bement Arch, a few miles up Davis Gulch. I considered taking the hike, but decided it would have to wait for another trip.

Camping at the head of Davis Gulch was quite remarkable. It was very peaceful, calm and cool. At night, I could see lots of stars, and the moonlight cast some pretty neat shadows on the canyon walls.

The next day's agenda was to explore more canyons on the Escalante River Arm. Here's my track, exploring Fiftymile canyon, Clear Creek Canyon and Indian Creek Canyon.

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I motor out of Davis Gulch . . .

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. . . and enter Fifty Mile Canyon, which had some pretty good beaches for campsites.

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. . . then, I explore Clear Creek Canyon. Clear Creek Canyon is famous for its Cathedral in the Desert.

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Here are some photos of the Cathedral in the Desert. Rocks went straight up from the water, and even arched over. It was a very relaxing place, quiet, cool, refreshing. I stayed for about a half hour, just taking it all in, and enjoying it.

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My Photos don't really capture what its like in the Cathedral in the Desert.
Ok, its time to move on. Even outside the Cathedral, the water is very calm and picturesque.

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I start to look for a campsite for the night. The goal is to find a sandy beach that is shaded in the afternoon. Seems like there aren't a whole lot of them, but I spot this one:

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and it is not occupied, so I take it! Canyon exploring today: I logged 16.7 NM.

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This bit of a canyon is very nice. It is shady, has a nice steep, sandy beach, and even a decent view, and it is a ways from the main channel, so I don't bet a lot of wake from passing boats. Here is a view from my camp, in the morning.

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Today I will go as far north as I will get on Lake Powell. On the track below, in the upper right corner is a "horseshoe" shaped land formation, known as the Rincon. It is known for some good camp sites, good hikes, and of course . . . an arch! I do a bit of planning and calculations. and decide it is time to head back.

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But before heading back, I decide to head north just a bit, hoping to see Stove Pipe Arch. Well, its on the chart, somewhere up there, but I didn't it. So its time to turn back. I make it up to Buoy 71, so I am 71 miles from Glenn Canyon Dam. They buoys go up over 130, so there is lots more of Lake Powell to see - maybe next trip! As I motor south, I decide to stop in Reflection Canyon

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As I turn into Reflection Canyon, I see this pretty cool rock formation, and it looks like a pretty good place to find a campsite.

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But it turns out that it is all slick rock back there, so I continue farther in. Then, I come upon this really great camp. After securing the boat, I can see now why they named this canyon Reflection Canyon.

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My camp site is very nice - right at a bend in the canyon, at the base of a steep cliff, and shaded too. Motored 18.8 NM today. I inflate the kayak and paddle to the end of the canyon. On the way in, I start to notice all of these tree trunks sticking out of the water.

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This camp is another great one. Shade, sandy beach, shallow water - good for swimming, and very peaceful. The moon is fairly full tonight. I try taking some time exposure photos, trying to get the rocks, water, and the stars too.

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Here's the cliff, lit by the moonlight, with the stars above:

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And here's a shot early in the morning. I think the planet in the sky is Jupiter - at least that's what the "Planets" App on my iPhone indicates.

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After breakfast, its time to go canyon exploring! I motor up to the end of Reflection Canyon, where all the trees are, and then explore the other arm, which another chart shows as Cottonwood Canyon - maybe those are dead Cottonwood trees, that were there before they flooded the area to create Lake Powell?

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Time to move on. Today, I head south, explore a couple of side canyons, stop at Dangling Rope Marina for Ice cream, top off the drinking water, and get a bit of gas, then I head back to Dungeon Canyon.

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Heading south, I see on the chart a canyon name Music Temple Canyon. I decide its a good one to explore. As I get near the end of the canyon, I think this is the Music Temple:

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I motor in, and around the "stage" (rock in the middle), in full view of the "audience".
There is a really nice beach at the end of Music Temple Canyon. I beach the boat and have lunch.

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From the head of Music Temple Canyon, there is a pretty good view of Butterfly Arch.

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Here is another shot of the Music Temple, as I motor back out to the main channel

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Now, we are exploring Mountain Sheep Canyon. My two Buddies Dino and Large Sheep come out and pose for a photo in Mountain Sheep Canyon. The canyons in the south end of the lake are not nearly as tall as the ones in the north end, but they still meander around and go back quite a ways, and are still fun to explore.

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Well, it looks like we've reached the end. It's about 8 feet deep here so there is plenty of depth, but I think if I continue, I'll get stuck!

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So it is time to back out. This canyon is pretty narrow, and I have to end up backing out quite a ways before I get to a section where it is wide enough to turn the boat around.

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So now I'm back to Dungeon Canyon. I motored 27.3 NM today. The sunset brings out the colors as I cook my dinner.

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The next day's journey takes me from Dungeon Canyon all the way back through the Castle Rock Cut and back to Wahweap Bay. My plan is to camp out on Wahweap Bay and head back to the launch ramp in the morning.

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As I'm motoring along the channel, I think this is Camel Rock. And it looks like the tour boat is coming too.

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He's really moving, and he sure puts out a lot of wake!

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Looking north, I think I see some rain coming.

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As we motor by, my buddy Dino poses in front of Dinosaur Rock.

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OK, time for another Canyon adventure! This is Labyrinth Canyon. Most of these canyons in the south don't have any good places to boat camp. Most are lots of slick rock.

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I continue motoring along the channel, then go through the Castle Rock Cut, and into Wahweap Bay. And look! An arch! This is the Wahweap Window Arch.

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On Wahweap bay, there actually is a bit of wind, so I finally get to do a bit of sailing. I sail over to the northwest side of the bay, and I round Lone Rock:

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Then, I head back to the main part of the bay, and beach the boat. 34.5 NM motored today. Here is the view looking toward Page, Arizona. I think that structure is the Navajo power plant.

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The evening skies put on a spectacular display of color.

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So I am across Wahweap Bay from the launch ramp. I pick a beach spot that is somewhat sheltered from the wind. I cook dinner, enjoy the sunset, and hit the sack. But I didn't listen to the weather forecast. During the night, the wind changed directions, and now, it is blowing on my stern, and pushing me onto the beach! Not good. Its blowing pretty hard too, and there is a lot of fetch, so it is a bit rough. I made sure things were secured, and then went back to bed, figuring I wouldn't be able to make it off the beach while the wind was blowing hard.

I woke up well before dawn, and noticed that it was calm. Dead Calm! Pretty dark too, but some light from the moon. The forecast was for winds to pick up in the morning, so I decided this was my window of opportunity. I pulled up the anchors, and managed to get the boat off the beach, and motored slowly back toward the launch ramp. The moon was out, but it was still pretty dark. In my haste when leaving the boat ramp 2 weeks ago, I forgot to set a waypoint on the GPS. So I am slowly motoring in the dark, making sure to avoid the houseboats moored on buoys - many of them not lit. I see a dock with lots of lights on it. It is the dump station. Good! I need to dump, so I pull right up - No waiting at 5am today. I dump the porta-potty, and clean up the boat a bit. I'm tempted to stay here and catch some more ZZZs, but then, I notice the boat ramp is right next door. It is unlit, but I can see well enough to get there. So I motor on over, and tie up. I cook breakfast, eat, and have my morning coffee, clean up the boat a bit, and wait. I'm thinking that it is a lot easier to pull the boat out in daylight, but then, it is a whole lot cooler now. First light is still an hour away, so I decide to pull the boat out in the dark. It is a bit tricky, but I've got lots of time. The trailer tongue extension comes in handy again - I don't need to back the van into the water. While I am unrigging up in the parking lot, I notice some of the resort employees walking to work, with headlamps on. But it is nice and cool, and so I can take my time and get the boat unrigged, cleaned up, drained and dry. By sunrise, things are pretty much done, and I'm just about ready to go.

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But, lucky me - the trip is not over yet. I made plans to visit Bryce Canyon National Park and Zion National Park. I've traveled this route several times before, and kept saying someday, I'll visit some of these National Parks. So this was the time.

Having the boat along made things a bit more difficult when I was trying to reserve a campsite at the national parks - requiring an RV spot with 40+ ft of space. To make matters worse, Fall is the busy season in Southern Utah, because the weather is cooler than in the summer. I managed to get an RV spot at Zion for 2 nights, but at Bryce, I ended up making a reservation at a private campground. But private campgrounds have their advantages. An electric site allowed me to charge my boat battery. And the resort has a shower, a pool and a hot tub, which felt really good after a day's hiking in the Hodoos of Bryce Canyon.

After a few days at Bryce, and then a few days at Zion (including an incredible hike up to Angel's Landing, and up the Virgin River), it was time to head home.

What a great cruise! Not much sailing, but some really spectacular scenery and a lot of fun canyons to explore. Lots of great hiking too. I think next time, I'll launch at the north end of the lake, Bullfrog Marina, UT. Then, I'll be able to see the north end of the lake. 2 weeks was great, but not enough time to see the whole lake. But then, people tell me they've spent a lifetime exploring Lake Powell and still haven't seen everything!

Summary of the Lake Powell Sailing part of the Trip:

14 days on Lake Powell
270.9 Nautical Miles traveled, mostly motoring.
57.2 hours on the motor, using approximately 11 1/2 gallons of gas.

Lots more of my Lake Powell Cruise photos:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeffd4449 ... 527625420/

Resources:

Charts: Fish-n-Map: Lake Powell South, Lake Powell North
Stan Jones Boating and Exploring Lake Powell Map
Lake Powell Hikes, and Lake Powell Magazine, by Dave Tate
Boater's Guide To Lake Powell, by Michael Kelsey
Last edited by jeffd on Mon Nov 09, 2015 5:03 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Lake Powell Cruise Report

Postby kuriti » Thu Jan 08, 2015 7:08 am

As usual, great write up! Makes me want to go west and explore some of those canyons.
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